BINARIES AND DIALECTS

Binaries are norms or customs that “reflect hegemonic (influential) ideas and stereotypes that come from dominant ideologies” (Quist-Adade, SOCI 2235: Social Theory and Social Justice, 2013, p. 8), of other cultures or societies that maybe foreign to us. It identifies the conflicts and behaviours that arise from influential norms and stereotypes within a society. An example of a binary would be to say that car accidents are a direct result of poor driving laws; where it may in fact be due to other factors.

“Dialectics are the opposite of Binaries, and involve a cyclical process of conflict and struggle of opposite positions; guided by the law of change” (Quist-Adade, SOCI 2235: Social Theory and Social Justice, 2013, p. 8). It is the idea of the conflict/struggle that allows for a new perspective to emerge; thus creating a stronger, more accurate and appropriate view. According to Dr. CQA, Hegel called this “the law of the dialectics, which uses the original thesis (view), and with the anti-thesis (conflict or opposition) creates a synthesis (the fusion of the two)” (Quist-Adade, SOCI 2235: Social Theory and Social Justice, 2013, pp. 8-9). An example would be to argue that driving laws are actually due to poor driving experience/age of the driver; so government imposes stronger driving laws on youths.

REFERENCES

Quist-Adade, C. (2013). SOCI 2235: Social Theory and Social Justice. Surrey, BC, Canada: Kwantlen Polytechnic University: Faculty of Arts.

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